Quotes by Quintilian

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Everything that has a beginning comes to an end. more...

To my mind the boy who gives least promise is one in whom the critical faculty develops in advance of the imagination. more...

Without natural gifts technical rules are useless. more...

Where evil habits are once settled, they are more easily broken than mended. more...

While we are examining into everything we sometimes find truth where we least expected it. more...

God, that all-powerful Creator of nature and architect of the world, has impressed man with no character so proper to distinguish him from other animals, as by the faculty of speech. more...

Nature herself has never attempted to effect great changes rapidly. more...

That which prematurely arrives at perfection soon perishes. more...

When we cannot hope to win, it is an advantage to yield. more...

For the mind is all the easier to teach before it is set. more...

He who speaks evil only differs from his who does evil in that he lacks opportunity. more...

To swear, except when necessary, is becoming to an honorable man. more...

Fear of the future is worse than one's present fortune. more...

It seldom happens that a premature shoot of genius ever arrives at maturity. more...

Verse satire indeed is entirely our own. more...

It is much easier to try one's hand at many things than to concentrate one's powers on one thing. more...

The prosperous can not easily form a right idea of misery. more...

Though ambition in itself is a vice, yet it is often the parent of virtues. more...

Vain hopes are like certain dreams of those who wake. more...

Though ambition may be a fault in itself, it is often the mother of virtues. more...

A man who tries to surpass another may perhaps succeed in equaling inot actually surpassing him, but one who merely follows can never quite come up with him: a follower, necessarily, is always behind. more...

A liar ought to have a good memory. more...

Those who wish to appear learned to fools, appear as fools to the learned. more...

In a crowd, on a journey, at a banquet even, a line of thought can itself provide its own seclusion. more...

A great part of art consists in imitation. For the whole conduct of life is based on this: that what we admire in others we want to do ourselves. more...

By writing quickly we are not brought to write well, but by writing well we are brought to write quickly. more...

Let us never adopt the maxim, Rather lose our friend than our jest. more...

Sayings designed to raise a laugh are generally untrue and never complimentary. Laughter is never far removed from derision. more...

Lately we have had many losses. more...

A liar must have a good memory. -Mendacem oportet esse memorem more...

She abounds with lucious faults. more...

A Woman who is generous with her money is to be praised; not so, if she is generous with her person more...

An evil-speaker differs from an evil-doer only in the want of opportunity. more...

Medicine for the dead is too late more...

Usage is the best language teacher. more...

That which offends the ear will not easily gain admission to the mind. more...

For all the best teachers pride themselves on having a large number of pupils and think themselves worthy of a bigger audience. more...

Although virtue receives some of its excellencies from nature, yet it is perfected by education. more...

Other parts of the body assist the speaker, but these speak themselves. By them we ask, we promise, we invoke, we dismiss, we threaten, we entreat, we deprecate; we express fear, joy, grief, our doubts, our assent, our penitence; we show moderation, profusion; we mark number and time. more...

The learned understand the reason of art; the unlearned feel the pleasure. more...

Minds that are stupid and incapable of science are in the order of nature to be regarded as monsters and other extraordinary phenomena; minds of this sort are rare. Hence I conclude that there are great resources to be found in children, which are suffered to vanish with their years. It is evident, therefore, that it is not of nature, but of our own negligence, we ought to complain. more...

Give me the boy who rouses when he is praised, who profits when he is encouraged and who cries when he is defeated. Such a boy will be fired by ambition; he will be stung by reproach, and animated by preference; never shall I apprehend any bad consequences from idleness in such a boy. more...

Those who wish to appear wise among fools, among the wise seem foolish. [Lat., Qui stultis videri eruditi volunt, stulti eruditis videntur.] more...

Satiety is a neighbor to continued pleasures. [Lat., Continuis voluptatibus vicina satietas.] more...

Though ambition in itself is a vice, yet it is often the parent of virtues. [Lat., Licet ipsa vitium sit ambitio, frequenter tamen causa virtutem est.] more...

Suffering itself does less afflict the senses than the apprehension of suffering. more...

Too exact, and studious of similitude rather than of beauty. [Lat., Nimis in veritate, et similitudinis quam pulchritudinis amantior.] more...

The soul languishing in obscurity contracts a kind of rust, or abandons itself to the chimera of presumption; for it is natural for it to acquire something, even when separated from any one. more...

To swear, except when necessary, is becoming to an honorable man. [Lat., In totum jurare, nisi ubi necesse est, gravi viro parum convenit.] more...

Although virtue receives some of its excellencies from nature, yet it is perfected by education. [Lat., Virtus, etiamsi quosdam impetus a natura sumit, tamen perficienda doctrina est.] more...

(Slaughter) means blood and iron. [Lat., Coedes videtur significare sanguinem et ferrum.] more...

One thing, however, I must premise, that without the assistance of natural capacity, rules and precepts are of no efficacy. more...

The obscurity of a writer is generally in proportion to his incapacity. more...

While we are making up our minds as to when we shall begin. the opportunity is lost. more...

Men of quality are in the wrong to undervalue, as they often do, the practise of a fair and quick hand in writing; for it is no immaterial accomplishment. more...

For comic writers charge Socrates with making the worse appear the better reason. more...

It is easier to do many things than to do one thing continuously for a long time. more...

It is the heart which inspires eloquence. more...

If you direct your whole thought to work itself, none of the things which invade eyes or ears will reach the mind. more...

From writing rapidly it does not result that one writes well, but from writing well it results that one writes rapidly. more...

We should not write so that it is possible for the reader to understand us, but so that it is impossible for him to misunderstand us. more...

While we ponder when to begin, it becomes too late to do. more...

There is no one who would not rather appear to know than to be taught. more...

Prune what is turgid, elevate what is commonplace, arrange what is disorderly, introduce rhythm where the language is harsh, modify where it is too absolute. more...

Write quickly and you will never write well; write well, and you will soon write quickly. more...

One should aim not at being possible to understand, but at being impossible to misunderstand. more...

Study depends on the goodwill of the student, a quality that cannot be secured by compulsion. more...

A mediocre speech supported by all the power of delivery will be more impressive than the best speech unaccompanied by such power. more...

Ambition is a vice, but it may be the father of virtue. more...

Virtue, though she gets her beginning from nature, yet receives her finishing touches from learning. more...

Nothing can be pleasing which is not also becoming. more...

Give bread to a stranger, in the name of the universal brotherhood which binds together all men under the common father of nature. more...

Whilst we deliberate how to begin a thing, it grows too late to begin it. more...

We excuse our sloth under the pretext of difficulty. more...

The perfection of art is to conceal art. more...

It is fitting that a liar should be a man of good memory. more...

Those who wish to appear wise among fools, among the wise seem foolish. more...

A liar should have a good memory. more...

Nothing is more dangerous to men than a sudden change of fortune. more...

Consequently the student who is devoid of talent will derive no more profit from this work than barren soil from a treatise on agriculture. more...

In almost everything, experience is more valuable than precept. more...

For it would have been better that man should have been born dumb, nay, void of all reason, rather than that he should employ the gifts of Providence to the destruction of his neighbor. more...

The mind is exercised by the variety and multiplicity of the subject matter, while the character is moulded by the contemplation of virtue and vice. more...

The gifts of nature are infinite in their variety, and mind differs from mind almost as much as body from body. more...

Men, even when alone, lighten their labors by song, however rude it may be. more...

We must form our minds by reading deep rather than wide. more...

While we are making up our minds as to when we shall begin, the opportunity is lost. more...

As regards parents, I should like to see them as highly educated as possible, and I do not restrict this remark to fathers alone. more...

Forbidden pleasures alone are loved immoderately; when lawful, they do not excite desire. more...

Though ambition itself be a vice, yet it is often times the cause of virtues. more...

Our minds are like our stomaches; they are whetted by the change of their food, and variety supplies both with fresh appetite. more...

The pretended admission of a fault on our part creates an excellent impression. more...

It is the nurse that the child first hears, and her words that he will first attempt to imitate. more...

When defeat is inevitable, it is wisest to yield. more...

It is worth while too to warn the teacher that undue severity in correcting faults is liable at times to discourage a boy's mind from effort. more...

A laugh costs too much when bought at the expense of virtue. more...

A laugh, if purchased at the expense of propriety, costs too much. more...

A religion without mystics is a philosophy. more...

Conscience is a thousand witnesses. more...

The learned understand the reason of the art, the unlearned feel the pleasure. more...

Vain hopes are often like the dreams of those who wake. more...

We give to necessity the praise of virtue. more...

We should not write so that it is possible for to understand us, but so that it is impossible for him to misunderstand us. more...

That laughter costs too much which is purchased by the sacrifice of decency. more...

Those who wish to seem learned to fools, seem fools to the learned. more...

Our minds are like our stomachs; they are whetted by the change of their food, and variety supplies both with fresh appetites. more...


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